| Workshop

MAGIC HUNAN – FOLK ART HAND’S ON WORKSHOP

03:00 to 05:00
Level 1, 151 Castlereagh Street, Sydney, NSW, Australia

17-10-15

Date & Time: 2-4pm, 17 Oct 2015 (Sat)
Venue: China Cultural Centre in Sydney
Entry: Free 

Wanna experience the magic of Hunan Intangible Cultural Heritage? Come and join us for the hands-on workshops which will allow you to try four fun hand’s on activities from Hunan including Chang Sha Palm Leaf Weaving, Xiang Xi Miao Frabric Painting, Mei Shan Paper-cutting and Da Bu River Folk embroidery Art.

Changsha Palm-leaf Weaving
It is a unique traditional folk art in South China. It is said that people in the Warring States Period could already make brooms and coops by weaving palm leaves. Craftsmen made raincoats and beds out of palm fibers and later used the fresh leaves to make cute animals. Changsha Palm- leaf Weaving uses the old and fresh leaves to show the dark and light colours, producing unexpected effects.
Meishan Paper-cut
Meishan Paper-cut is a time honored craft used in sacrifice, wedding ceremony, festival, birthday party, interior decoration and shadow play, and gradually evolves into an art form. The most common pattern is “goose” used in wedding ceremony.
Dubujiang Quilting Embroidery
Using rags and old clothes as raw materials, it mainly adopts the five colors of black, white, blue, red and yellow. The original modeling art originated from the Ming Dynasty and was prevailing in the Qing Dynasty and the Republic of China period. It is mainly in planar composition but occasionally combines Hunan Embroidery craft, creating some light and stereo effects.
Miao Painting
Miao Painting, also known as the painting on Miao costumes, originated from ancient tattoos. The main patterns involve auspicious dragon, phoenix, commonly seen fish, birds, insects, shrimps, bats, magpies, flowers, mountains, rivers, clouds, the sun, the moon, men, buildings and legendary Gods. It is not only seen on costumes, but also used to decorate the curtain, quilt cover, accessories and so on. It is often used as a token among young people.
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